The Legacy of Political Humour and Satirists in the History of Iranian Journalism

Event by our partner: McGill Iranian Students Association and Ronak Association

Lecturer will be by Dr. Mahmud Farjami, Assoc. Prof. Visiting Scholar Oslo Metropolitan University. In this event at McGill University, he explores political satire as a journalistic genre in Iran since the latter days of the Qajar dynasty to the contemporary era. It answers a question that looks simple but is very complicated: “What role has political humor played in the history of journalism in Iran?”

Poster of this event

Additionally, this lecture surveys political satire as a journalistic genre, especially as expressed in cartoons, in Iran since the latter days of the Qajar dynasty to the present, thus spanning one century and more. Moreover, this lecture is a effort to answer a question that looks simple but is very complicated: Why would Iranian produce satire as a political act ? and to find out what motivates political satirists.

Political satire is satire that specializes in gaining entertainment from politics; it has also been used with subversive intent where political speech and dissent are forbidden by a regime, as a method of advancing political arguments where such arguments are expressly forbidden. Political satire is usually distinguished from political protest or political dissent, as it does not necessarily carry an agenda nor seek to influence the political process. While occasionally it may, it more commonly aims simply to provide entertainment. By its very nature, it rarely offers a constructive view in itself; when it is used as part of protest or dissent, it tends to simply establish the error of matters rather than provide solutions.

You can join to this meeting via Zoom:

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https://mcgill.zoom.us/j/81586898254?pwd=MGJYR3puWDN3dXlJQ2dZSDNXNU9kdz09
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